Funding

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OppNet has multiple active funding opportunities that focus on basic social, behavioral, and biopsychosocial sciences to advance the understanding of fundamental mechanisms and patterns of behavioral and social functioning, relevant to the Nation's health and wellbeing, and as they interact with each other, with biology, and with the environment. Consequently, OppNet does not issue funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) that directly involve intervention studies. Check each FOA for the NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices participating in that OppNet FOA.

Mid-career enhancement awards to integrate basic behavioral, biomedical, and/or social scientific processes (K18)

These career-development FOAs are designed for investigators who want to acquire expertise that is beyond and also enhances their current areas of scientific expertise—specifically, to expand their research trajectories through the acquisition of new knowledge and skills in the areas of basic psychological processes, sociological processes, and/or biomedical pathways. OppNet K18s can support a variety of career development experiences and projects that will lead awardees to conduct future independent research projects that more thoroughly integrate interrelationships among behavioral, biological, endocrine, epigenetic, immune, inflammatory, neurological, psychological, and/or social processes. Check our Answers to frequently asked questions, List of funded OppNet K18 projects, and the FOAs for more information.

  • PAR-20-226: Mid-career enhancement awards to integrate basic behavioral, biomedical, and/or social scientific processes (K18, Basic experimental studies with humans required, BESH)
  • PAR-20-211: Mid-career enhancement awards to integrate basic behavioral, biomedical, and/or social scientific processes (K18, No independent clinical trials)

Research on biopsychosocial factors of social connectedness and isolation on health, wellbeing, illness, and recovery (R01)

These FOAs invite research projects that seek to explain the underlying mechanisms, processes, and trajectories of social relationships and how these factors affect outcomes in health, illness, recovery, and overall wellbeing. Both animal and human subjects research projects are welcome through PAR-19-373. Researchers should consider PAR-19-384 for studies that prospectively assign human participants to conditions (i.e., experimentally manipulate independent variables) and that assess biomedical and/or behavioral outcomes in humans to understand fundamental aspects of phenomena related to social connectedness and isolatedness.

  • PAR-19-373: Research on biopsychosocial factors of social connectedness and isolation on health, wellbeing, illness, and recovery (R01, Clinical trials not allowed, CTNA)
  • PAR-19-384: Research on biopsychosocial factors of social connectedness and isolation on health, wellbeing, illness, and recovery (R01, Basic experimental studies with humans required, BESH)

More information on OppNet funding opportunities

OppNet acknowledges that disease-, risk-, and wellness-contexts can provide opportunities to study basic behavioral or social processes, basic biobehavioral or biosocial interrelationships, or methodology and measurement relevant to the NIH definition of basic behavioral and social science research (b-BSSR). Given the NIH mission, OppNet funding opportunities welcome applications that propose projects in a broad variety of settings, including general population and clinical samples. Projects also can include disease (or risk-factor) outcomes, so long as the focus of a study is on basic behavioral or social processes, basic biobehavioral or biosocial interrelationships, or methodology and measurement relevant to BSSR research.

Consequently, OppNet strongly encourages interested researchers to consult the bBSSR and BSSR definitions and the scientific contacts listed on OppNet FOAs before deciding to apply.

In response to current Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects ('Common Rule') and the NIH’s efforts to improve rigor, reproducibility, and reporting across scientific disciplines involved in health-related research, the NIH now uses the term clinical trial broadly, "A research study in which one or more human subjects are prospectively assigned to one or more interventions (which may include placebo or other control) to evaluate the effects of those interventions on health-related biomedical or behavioral outcomes." Click the graphic below for help to determine whether your proposed research study with human subjects meets NIH’s definition of a clinical trial.

Click to to learn more about NIH Clinical Trials